About the Travel Blog

We're on a budget ... sometimes. We stay in fancy hotels ... sometimes. We're not so wealthy that we can live the life of the "rich and famous" (although we did once share a restaurant dining room with Robin Leach!), but if we're careful about how we spend our money, we can have some pretty amazing experiences. Even better, we're fortunate enough to be able to take our virtual businesses with us, so we earn while we learn!

This blog will provide you with itineraries, travel guides and tips -- and we hope to see you on the road!

 

Food in Estonia - Blood Sausage

When in Rome ....

Blood Sausage

I love trying local/ethnic foods - so does Allan! So, I decided to take the plunge (being the female Anthony Bourdain that I am) and try ANYTHING! 

So, I did it, I had blood sausage. Let me start with saying that I thought blood sausage used the term artistically, kind of like a blood orange, i.e. it may look bloody but there's not really any blood in it. 

Hard to describe how it tasted, but unlike most sausage which is like any piece of meat, it was more like bits of things pasted together. The bits were hard to identify, as was the stuff that pasted it together. Also, I should mention it is a traditional Christmas dish. So what is it? Well, let me share the Wikipedia definition:

"Blood sausages are sausages filled with blood that are cooked or dried and mixed with a filler until they are thick enough to congeal when cooled. The dish is found world-wide. Pig, cattle, sheep, duck, and goat blood can be used depending on different countries.

In Europe and the Americas, typical fillers include meat, fat, suet, bread, cornmeal, onion, chestnutsbarley, and oatmeal."

All I can say is since I learned what it is, I am trying to wipe the memory of eating it from my brain. Merry Christmas! 


 

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